See how BBfN is built

Watch how fast broadband is being rolled out across the country by clicking on the video on the right and read below about the technology being used.

See how BBfN is built

Watch how fast broadband is being rolled out across the country by clicking on the video on the right and read below about the technology being used.

BBfN – The technology

To achieve the most efficient infrastructure implementation for BBfN, BT has applied the same principles as used for its commercial roll-out.

Fibre to the cabinet (FTTC)

The first choice of technology is fibre to the cabinet (FTTC). This is the most widely used infrastructure in the UK and it uses a mixture of fibre optic and copper cabling, making it the most cost effective solution for deploying broadband services in the majority of situations. Copper cable connects a home or business premises to a street ‘cabinet’ (a green box located in the area) which is then connected to another new street cabinet. The new cabinet is connected to a ‘fibre spine’ which is connected to a ‘head-end’ (a major exchange which is connected to the UK’s network ‘backbone’). FTTC, quite literally, brings a fibre optic connection to a street cabinet. Telecommunication services travel more quickly over fibre cable and they don’t slow down over distance (as they do when copper cable is used).

 

Fibre to the premises (FTTP)

The second choice of technology is fibre to the premises (FTTP). A fibre link is used to connect a home or business premises directly to the head-end. Small clusters or groups of users (usually 16-32) are served via a ‘splitter’ which allows the individual fibres to home and business premises to be concentrated onto a much lower number of fibres back to the head-end.

 

Directly connected to an exchange

The third choice is to provide FTTC to home or business premises which are currently directly connected to an exchange. This is achieved by re-arranging the current network and installing cabinets in new locations.